Unanimity | Definition, Etymology, Synonyms & Antonyms

Unanimity

Unanimity (noun)

Definition

“Unanimity” refers to the state of complete agreement or consensus among a group of people, where everyone is in accord and shares the same opinion, decision, or viewpoint.

Etymology

The word “unanimity” has Latin origins. It comes from the Latin word “┼źnanimus,” which is a combination of “┼źnus” meaning “one” and “animus” meaning “mind” or “spirit.” Thus, “unanimity” literally means “of one mind” or “with one accord.”

Synonyms

  • Consensus
  • Agreement
  • Harmony
  • Unity
  • Concord
  • Accord

Antonyms

  • Disagreement
  • Discord
  • Dissension
  • Conflict
  • Division

Example

During the board meeting, all members of the committee expressed their support for the new policy proposal with absolute unanimity, demonstrating their shared commitment to its success.

FAQs (Frequently Asked Questions)

Why is unanimity important in decision-making?

Unanimity is important in decision-making because it indicates a high level of agreement and unity among individuals. It can lead to stronger collective decisions, increased morale, and a sense of solidarity within a group.

Is unanimity always achievable in group discussions?

Achieving unanimity in group discussions can be challenging, especially in complex or contentious matters. While it may not always be achievable, striving for consensus and open dialogue can lead to better outcomes.

How does unanimity differ from a simple majority vote?

Unanimity requires the agreement of every member in a group, while a simple majority vote only requires more than half of the members to agree. Unanimity represents a higher level of cohesion and agreement.

What strategies can be used to foster unanimity in a team setting?

Fostering unanimity involves active listening, open communication, respect for diverse viewpoints, and a willingness to compromise. Encouraging constructive discussions and finding common ground are also effective strategies.

Are there situations where unanimity might not be desirable?

In some cases, seeking unanimity might lead to a delay in decision-making or a watered-down solution. In time-sensitive scenarios, a consensus approach or allowing for majority decisions might be more practical and efficient.

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